Whats Does Gluten Free Mean ? What Are The Gluten Free Foods ?

whats does gluten free mean

Gluten is a protein that occurs in certain types of grainsFor example, wheat protein consists of 80% gluten. Gluten is stored by the plant in the grainThis serves as a reserve food for the plant.
Gluten is therefore a protein. However, you can divide it into two types of protein groups, namely; glutenins and gliadins. The latter group (gliadins) are the culprit for people with celiac disease (gluten allergy) or a gluten intolerance.

whats does gluten free mean


Gluten provides the airy structure of bread. The gluten proteins are responsible for the "network" that is formed during bread baking. This network that is formed is important during the rising period. Without gluten, the bread has no structure and the bread will not rise / ferment.
In addition to bread, many other (ready-made) products also contain gluten such as: breadcrumbs, couscous, pastas, binders, sauces, soups, sweets, snacks, cookies and ready-made meals. Even non-edible products, such as colored pencils, can contain gluten. Gluten can not (yet) be completely removed from some cereals. That is why substitute grains are used to still place certain products on the shelves.

Why eat gluten-free?

Some people cannot tolerate gluten, which can lead to gastrointestinal complaints and even to growth disorders. But also for people without an allergy or intolerance it is wise not to get too much gluten. Some people cannot tolerate gluten, which can lead to gastrointestinal complaints and even to growth disorders. But also for people without an allergy or intolerance it is wise not to get too much gluten.

Gluten intolerant (celiac disease) or sensitive?

The term gluten allergy is widely used, but gluten allergy does not exist. You can be allergic to wheat. This is called a wheat allergy, but this is rare. But what do you call it when you can handle gluten well? Celiac disease  or gluten sensitivity.

Celiac disease

In the first case (celiac disease) one also speaks of gluten intolerance. In people with celiac disease, the intestinal flakes break down if they regularly come into contact with gluten. This causes various abdominal complaints. How do you know if you have celiac disease? For celiac disease you can determine or exclude this by means of blood tests, and additionally with a test for genetic predisposition and by taking a small intestine biopsy.

Gluten sensitivity

Sensitive to gluten, but no celiac disease or wheat allergy? It is also possible that you are just very sensitive to the proteins in grains. It may be that some people, even if there is no celiac disease, respond well to a gluten-free diet. In this case there would be gluten sensitivity, also called: Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS).

What is celiac disease and how do I recognize it?

As we said in the previous cup, the intestinal flakes in people with celiac disease break if they regularly come into contact with gluten. This causes various abdominal complaints. If you walk around with this for too long, the sheet piling can be seriously damaged by too much contact with gluten and there are no longer any gut flakes left. The surface of the small intestine then becomes smooth and too small, which means that you can absorb fewer nutrients and you can quickly get a vitamin and mineral deficiency. This can cause unpleasant symptoms throughout the body.

Complaints and symptoms

The symptoms can vary per person. Some people have very light and vague symptoms while others cause very severe symptoms.

Children

The complaints are the clearest in small children. They often arise from +/- 7 months, when they first receive food such as bread and porridge that contains gluten. Some babies then get complaints such as a swollen abdomen, little or no appetite, vomiting and diarrhea. It may even be that they lag behind in growth and weight, that they have flat buttocks and a bulging belly, as well as thin arms and legs and that they cry a lot. They often also have stinky, greasy and foaming stools.

Adults

In adults, the symptoms are often much less clear. Damage to the intestinal wall in celiac disease can cause the following symptoms:
  • Persistent diarrhea
  • Smelly, greasy stools that often cause so-called 'brake marks' in the toilet
  • An abdominal distension
  • Stomach ache
  • Throwing up
  • Decreased appetite
  • Sometimes blockage occurs
But many adults with celiac disease also have symptoms that are not directly related to the intestine. Examples of this are: fatigue, anemia, osteoporosis, infertility and a general feeling of being sick.

What is gluten sensitivity and how do I recognize it?

Gluten sensitivity is a recognized condition for which there are unfortunately still many uncertainties. For example, it is not clear what the cause of gluten sensitivity is. Avoiding gluten-containing products does improve the symptoms, but the antibodies and intestinal damage that are typical of celiac disease are absent in these people. It is unclear what causes or causes complaints. People with gluten sensitivity have symptoms that are both reminiscent of celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome, namely abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea or constipation, complaints that are often accompanied by symptoms such as headache, migraine in NCGS. head, chronic fatigue, joint and muscle pain, a tingling or 'dead' feeling in arms, hands, legs and feet.

Diagnose

It is difficult to determine gluten sensitivity. It is not detectable in the blood or in the intestine. That is why you should first go to a doctor to rule out celiac disease or other diseases through a full examination. Also, looking for a dietician is not a bad idea, they can go through a process with you to avoid gluten in your diet for 6 weeks and then add gluten again. A doctor assesses the symptoms in both periods.

What are gluten in?

If you suffer from celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, it is useful to know which products contain and do not contain gluten. Below you will find two lists of products that do contain gluten.

Products that contain gluten

  • Wheat
  • wheatmeal
  • Wheat flour
  • Spelled (wild wheat)
  • Rogge
  • Rye flour
  • Rye flour
  • Happened
  • Barley malt flour
  • Haver *
  • Oatmeal
  • Havervlokken
  • Oatmeal
  • Semolina
  • Bulgur
  • Couscous
  • wheat germ
  • grains
  • cereal flakes
  • Gort
  • Parelgort
  • The boy
  • Mout
  • Kamut
  • Triticale (crossing of wheat and rye)
* Recent research has shown that pure oats do not contain gluten. However, it is recommended that celiac disease does not include oats in the diet, However, there is nowadays pure oats in different stores. If you buy oats, we recommend checking on the back if there are any traces of gluten in them. 
In addition to all the aforementioned cereal products, gluten is also present in all foods in which these cereals are processed, which means, among other things, in:

  • Brood
  • Crackers and rusks
  • Pastries, cookies and cake
  • All types of pasta (including filo pastry) and pizzas
  • Pancakes, tortilla, pita bread and naan
  • Soups, broth and sauces (gluten is used herein as a binder)
  • Marinated meats and meats
  • Seasoned meats and meats
  • Breaded products
  • Many types of sweets and snacks
  • Many types of ice cream and desserts
 

Where are no gluten in?

If you suffer from celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, it is useful to know which products contain and do not contain gluten. Below you will find two lists of products that do not contain gluten.

Products that do not contain gluten

  • Potatoes
  • Potato starch
  • Fruit
  • owner
  • Milk
  • Butter
  • Oil
  • Legumes
  • Vegetables
  • Raw food
  • grades
  • Rice (white, brown and brown rice)
  • Seeds
  • Meat 
  • Fish (not marinated and uncoated)
  • Poultry 
  • Cheese 
  • More
  • Maismeel (polenta)
  • Buckwheat
  • Quinoa
  • Tapiocameel
  • Coffee
  • Thee
  • Fizzy drink
  • Sap
  • Milk
Examples of gluten-free binders are:
  • Cornflour
  • Potato starch
  • Guar flour
  • Tapioca 
  • Sago
  • Lamb
  • Arrowroot 
  • Jelly
  • Locust bean gum / carob
  • Gelatine
  • Pectin

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